Historically Used In an Exclusive Sense, This Blog Aims to Explore What God's Up To Inside & Outside the Institutional Church

Where’s Fanny Crosby & Charles Wesley When Ya Need ’em?

Christian music has a long and glorious history. There are brilliant moments when heart, melody, instrumentation and verse have combined in a glorious symphony of sound and praise that surely echoes heaven. Such music has endured through  the ages. J.C. Ryle of days of yore, comments regarding hymns:

“Good hymns are an immense blessing to the Church of Christ. I believe the last day alone will show the world the real amount of good they have done. They suit all, both rich and poor. There is an elevating, stirring, soothing, spiritualizing, effect about a thoroughly good hymn, which nothing else can produce. It sticks in men’s memories when texts are forgotten. It trains men for heaven, where praise is one of the principal occupations. Preaching and praying shall one day cease for ever; but praise shall never die. The makers of good ballads are said to sway national opinion. The writers of good hymns, in like manner, are those who leave the deepest marks on the face of the Church.

But really good hymns are exceedingly rare. There are only a few men in any age who can write them. You may name hundreds of first-rate preachers for one first-rate writer of hymns. Hundreds of so-called hymns fill up our collections of congregational psalmody, which are really not hymns at all. They are very sound, very scriptural, very proper, very correct, very tolerably rhymed; but they are not real, live, genuine hymns. There is no life about them. At best they are tame, pointless, weak, and milk-and-watery.”

There are moments, well, that are not so heavenly. I suppose this clip is one of those examples – more corn than a Minnesota farmer’s field in July but it is catchy. Love the guitar solo but (questionable theology alert) is God really like a Mountie? And with that introduction…

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